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Phone: 03 9744 8999

Email: info@sunburymedicalcentre.com.au

Address: 38-40 Gap Rd Sunbury VIC 3429

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COVID – 19

 

Coronavirus update

All patients please be assured Sunbury Medical Centre is following all directed requirements from the Department of Health in regards to the recent outbreak.

 

Triage

All patients are screened to prevent cases from entering the Medical Centre.

If you have:

  • Travelled overseas in the last 14 days,
  • Had confirmed contact with COID-19,
  • Work in Healthcare or at an Airport

AND have a fever, shortness of breath or a cough. Please notify reception if this is the case before entering the clinic.

All appointments made through the Sunbury Medical Centre are triaged in accordance with the Department of Health.

All patients will be updated by SMS text messaging.

Fact sheet for patients from Victoria State Government  Department Health and Service.

https://www.health.gov.au/news/latest-information-about-novel-coronavirus


Novel coronavirus confirmed case

What you need to know

 

 

You have been identified as having the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). You must isolate yourself in your home, hotel or health care setting until Public Health authorities inform you it is safe for you to return to your usual activities.

Please read this information carefully.

 

What is novel coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a type of virus that can affect humans and animals. An outbreak of novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) was detected in Wuhan, China in late December 2019. Cases have been reported predominantly in mainland China, as well as other countries, including confirmed cases in Victoria. This virus can cause a severe respiratory illness.

What is a confirmed case?

A confirmed case is someone who has been tested for the novel coronavirus and the result was positive for the virus. This means that you have been infected with novel coronavirus and there is a risk that you could spread the virus to other people. As such, it is very important that you follow the recommendations outlined in this fact sheet.

What do I need to do?

Stay at home or in your hotel room

  • Isolate yourself at home or in your hotel room until you are advised by a Public Health Officer that you can return to your usual activities.
    • You must not leave your house or hotel room except to seek medical attention.
    • You should stay in a different room to other people as much as possible. Use a separate bathroom if available.
    • Wear a surgical face mask when you are in the same room as another person and when seeking medical care.
    • Do not go to work, school, university, work or attend public places or events. Do not use public transport or taxi services.
  • Where possible, get others such as friends or family, who are not required to be isolated, to get food or other necessities for you.
  • If you have difficulties getting food or necessities, call 1800 675 398 for support.
  • If you need a translator first call 131 450, then request the hotline on 1800 675 398. More information is available on our website: vic.gov.au/novelcoronavirus

Going outside

If you live in a private house, then it is safe for you to go outside into your garden, balcony or courtyard.

If you live in an apartment it is also safe for you to go outside into the garden while wearing a surgical mask. You should, however, go quickly through any common areas on the way to the garden. Wear a surgical mask if you have to move through these areas.

Monitor your symptoms

If your illness gets worse, you should call the doctor who cared for you or the emergency department where you were assessed. If it is a medical emergency (for example, shortness of breath at rest or difficulty breathing) you should:

  • Call 000 and request an ambulance
  • Inform the ambulance officers that you have novel coronavirus.

Your doctor or treating medical team will contact you daily to ask about your symptoms.

How can I prevent the spread of the virus to others?

Separate yourself from others

If you share a house with others, you should stay in a different room as much as possible. Wear a surgical mask when you are in the same room as another person. Use a separate bathroom if available. Avoid shared or communal areas.

Make sure you do not share a room with people who are at risk of severe disease, such as elderly people, those who have heart, lung or kidney conditions or diabetes.

Visitors who do not have an essential need to be in the home should not visit while you are in isolation.

Wash your hands and cover your coughs and sneezes

You should wash your hands regularly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. You can use an alcohol-base hand sanitiser if your hands are not visibly dirty. Wash your hands or use a hand sanitiser before entering an area or touching items shared with others.

You should cover your coughs and sneezes with either a tissue or your elbow. Dispose of tissue into a waste bin and make sure you wash your hands afterwards.

Avoid sharing household items

You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels bedding or other items with people in your house. After using these items, they should be washed thoroughly with detergent and water. A dishwasher may be used to wash crockery and utensils. Use the hottest settings possible.

Regularly clean household surfaces

Surfaces in shared areas should be cleaned daily with a household disinfectant or diluted bleach solution. Clean all frequently touched surfaces, such as counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables. Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, body fluids and/or secretions or excretions on them.

Read labels of cleaning products and follow recommendations on product labels. Labels contain instructions for safe and effective use of the cleaning product including precautions you should take when applying the product, such as wearing gloves or aprons and making sure the areas is well ventilated when using the product.

Use a household disinfectant or a diluted bleach solution on hard surfaces. To make a bleach solution at home, add 1 tablespoon of bleach to 4 cups of water.

Wash laundry thoroughly

Immediately remove and wash clothes or bedding that have blood, body fluids and/or secretions or excretions on them.

Wear a surgical mask and disposable gloves while handling soiled items. Wash your hands immediately after removing gloves.

Read and follow directions on labels of laundry or clothing items and detergent. In general, wash and dry with the hottest temperatures recommended on the clothing label.

Disposing of contaminated items

Place all disposable gloves, face masks, and other contaminated items in a lines waste bin before disposing of them with other household waste. Wash your hands immediately after handling these items.

When will I be able to come out of isolation?

This will depend on a number of factors including when your symptoms cease and how well you are feeling. You may need to have further specimens collected, such as nose and throat swabs, to determine that you are no longer infectious.

A Public Health Officer will advise you of these requirements and when your isolation has finished. You must not cease your isolation until you have been advised by the Public Health Officer that you can leave.

If your employer, school or university requires confirmation that you are no-longer infectious, please contact the department on 1300 651 160.

Looking after your well-being during isolation

Being confined to home for an extended period of time can cause stress and conflict. Tips for looking after yourself include:

  • Talk to the other members of the family about the infection. Understanding novel coronavirus will reduce anxiety.
  • Reassure young children using age-appropriate language.
  • Think about how you have coped with difficult situations in the past and reassure yourself that you will cope with this situation too. Remember that self-isolation won’t last for long.
  • Exercise regularly. Options could include exercise DVDs, dancing, floor exercises, yoga, walking around the backyard or using home exercise equipment, such as a stationary bicycle, if you have it. Exercise is a proven treatment for stress and depression.
  • Keep in touch with family members and friends via telephone, email or social media.
  • Keep up a normal daily routine as much as possible.
  • Arrange with your employer to work from home, if possible.
  • Ask your child’s school to supply assignments, work sheets and homework by post or email, or if the student can join the class using online options.
  • Don’t rely too heavily on the television and technology. Treat self-isolation as an opportunity to do some of those things you never usually have time for, such as board games, craft, drawing and reading.
  • If you are struggling to cope you call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636.

Information for caregivers and household members of a confirmed case of novel coronavirus

There should only be people in the home who are essential for providing care for the person, or who cannot find alternative accommodation.

Monitor for symptoms

If you are a caregiver or household member you should monitor yourself for symptoms of novel coronavirus. These include fever or cough or shortness. Other early signs and symptoms of infection can include chills, body aches, sore throat, headache, runny nose, muscle pain or diarrhoea.

If you develop any of the symptoms listed above:

  • Call a doctor or a hospital and inform them that you are a contact of a confirmed case of novel coronavirus.
  • Put on a mask if you have one.
  • Keep yourself away from others (for example, in a different room).
  • Do not travel on public transport and do not attend any public places.
  • When you arrive at the doctor’s surgery or hospital, tell them again that you are a contact of a confirmed case of novel coronavirus.

If you are experiencing severe symptoms, such as shortness of breath:

  • Call 000 and request an ambulance
  • Inform the ambulance officers that you have been in contact with someone with a confirmed case of novel coronavirus.

Wash your hands

Wash your hands often and thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. You can use an alcohol-based hand sanitiser if your hands are not visibly dirty. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Wear a surgical face mask

Wear a surgical face mask and disposable gloves when you are in the same room as the person with confirmed of suspected infection, or when you touch or have contact with the person’s blood, body fluids and/or secretions, such as sweat, saliva, sputum, nasal mucus, vomit, urine, or diarrhoea.

  • Throw out disposable facemasks and disposable gloves directly into a bin after use.
  • Wash your hands immediately after removing the face mask and gloves.

Where can I find out more information?

Call the Department of Health and Human Services on to discuss any questions you have. If you need a translator first call 131 450, then request the hotline on 1300 651 160.

For Victorian updates to the current incident, go to: https://www.dhhs.vic.gov.au/novelcoronavirus

For national updates: https://www.health.gov.au/news/latest-information-about-novel-coronavirus

For international updates: https://www.who.int/westernpacific/emergencies/novel-coronavirus

WHO resources  https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus

 

To receive this publication in an accessible format phone 1300 651 160, using the National Relay Service 131 450 if required, or email Public Health branch <public.health@dhhs.vic.gov.au>.

Authorised and published by the Victorian Government, 1 Treasury Place, Melbourne.

© State of Victoria, Australia, Department of Health and Human Services February, 2020

 

Coronavirus disease - suspected case

What you need to know

 

You have been notified by your doctor as being at risk of infection with the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and you have now developed symptoms. You must isolate yourself in your home, hotel or health care setting until your doctor has informed you that it is safe for you to return to your usual activities.

Please read this information carefully.

 

 

What is novel coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses which may cause illness in animals or humans.

The most recently discovered coronavirus (COVID-19) is a new virus that can cause an infection in people, including a severe respiratory illness.

What is a suspected case?

A suspected case is someone who has symptoms or signs of novel coronavirus and who is being tested for infection but has not found out the results of the tests yet. Until the results are known this means there is a risk that you could have novel coronavirus infection and could spread the virus to other people. As such, it is very important that you follow the recommendations outlined in this fact sheet.

What do I need to do?

Your doctor will arrange for you to be tested for the infection. It may take a few days for the test results to be returned. If your symptoms are serious you will need to remain in hospital isolated from other patients to prevent further spread of the virus.

If your doctor says you are well enough to return home while you are waiting for your test results you will need to stay isolated and monitor your symptoms as described below.

Stay at home or in your hotel room

  • Isolate yourself at home until you are advised of the results by your doctor.
    • You should not leave your house except to seek medical attention.
    • You should stay in a different room to other people as much as possible. Use a separate bathroom if available.
    • Wear a surgical face mask when you are in the same room as another person and when seeking medical care.
    • Do not go to work, school, university, work or attend public places or events. Do not use public transport or taxi services.
  • Where possible, get others such as friends or family, who are not required to be isolated, to get food or other necessities for you.
  • If you have difficulties getting food or necessities, call 1800 675 398 for support.
  • If you need a translator first call 131 450, then request the hotline on 1800 675 398. More information is available on our website: vic.gov.au/novelcoronavirus
  • Please keep Triple Zero (000) for emergencies only.

Going outside

If you live in a private house, then it is safe for you to go outside into your garden, balcony or courtyard.

If you live in an apartment it is also safe for you to go outside into the garden while wearing a surgical mask. You should, however, go quickly through any common areas on the way to the garden. Wear a surgical mask if you have to move through these areas.

 

Monitor your symptoms

If your illness gets worse, you should call the doctor who cared for you or the emergency department where you were assessed. If it is a medical emergency (for example, shortness of breath at rest or difficulty breathing) you should:

  • Call 000 and request an ambulance
  • Inform the ambulance officers that you may have novel coronavirus, and they should take precautions.

What happens if my test is negative?

Your doctor or a Public Health Officer will advise you if you are can cease your isolation. If you were in self-isolation at the time you developed your symptoms, for example because you have been in contact with a confirmed case or travelled to China, you will need to continue isolation until the 14 days since last contact with the confirmed case or from your arrival in Australia.

You should continue to carefully monitor your health for up to 14 days after your last contact with the confirmed case. Report any new or returning symptoms to your doctor in this period. You may be required to be tested again.

You do not require medical clearance to return to work, university or school. If you have stayed in isolation and remain well, then they are safe to return to their usual activities.

What happens if my test is positive?

A Public Health Officer will contact you to find out more information from you and provide you with further information. You must remain in your home or accommodation until further tests are completed and you have become well. After a discussion, a specialist may be involved to further assess your illness. A Public Health Officer will conduct an assessment to advise when it is safe to return to normal activities.

If your condition deteriorates, seek medical attention:

  • Notify the department or Public Health Officer managing your care by calling the number provided to you.
  • Follow the direction of the Public Health Officer who may advise you to go to a doctor or a hospital, and will agree with you how you should get there.
  • Call ahead to the doctor or hospital and inform them that you are a confirmed case of novel coronavirus.
  • If you need to leave your home or accommodation to seek medical attention, put on the mask provided to you.
  • When you arrive at the doctor’s surgery or hospital, tell them that you are a confirmed case of novel coronavirus.

If you are experiencing severe symptoms, such as shortness of breath:

  • Call 000 and request an ambulance
  • Inform the ambulance officers that you have novel coronavirus.

People who you have had close contact with including family members and people you live with will need to isolate themselves for 14 days since their last contact with you.

Looking after your well-being during isolation

Being confined to home for an extended period of time can cause stress and conflict. Tips for looking after yourself include:

  • Talk to the other members of the family about the infection. Understanding novel coronavirus will reduce anxiety.
  • Reassure young children using age-appropriate language.
  • Think about how you have coped with difficult situations in the past and reassure yourself that you will cope with this situation too. Remember that self-isolation won’t last for long.
  • Exercise regularly. Options could include exercise DVDs, dancing, floor exercises, yoga, walking around the backyard or using home exercise equipment, such as a stationary bicycle, if you have it. Exercise is a proven treatment for stress and depression.
  • Keep in touch with family members and friends via telephone, email or social media.
  • Keep up a normal daily routine as much as possible.
  • Arrange with your employer to work from home, if possible.
  • Ask your child’s school to supply assignments, work sheets and homework by post or email, or if the student can join the class using online options.
  • Don’t rely too heavily on the television and technology. Treat self-isolation as an opportunity to do some of those things you never usually have time for, such as board games, craft, drawing and reading.
  • If you are struggling to cope you call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636.

Where can I find out more information?

Call the Department of Health and Human Services on to discuss any questions you have. If you need a translator first call 131 450, then request the hotline on 1300 651 160.

For Victorian updates to the current incident, go to: https://www.dhhs.vic.gov.au/novelcoronavirus

For national updates: https://www.health.gov.au/news/latest-information-about-novel-coronavirus

For international updates: https://www.who.int/westernpacific/emergencies/novel-coronavirus

WHO resources  https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus

 

To receive this publication in an accessible format phone 1300 651 160, using the National Relay Service 131 450 if required, or email Public Health branch <public.health@dhhs.vic.gov.au>.

Authorised and published by the Victorian Government, 1 Treasury Place, Melbourne.

© State of Victoria, Australia, Department of Health and Human Services February, 2020

 

Coronavirus disease - close contact

What you need to know

 

You have been identified as having had close contact with someone diagnosed with 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19). A Public Health Officer from the Department of Health and Human Services will be in contact with you regularly while you are at risk of infection to monitor you for symptoms.

Please read this information carefully.

 

What is novel coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses which may cause illness in animals or humans.

The most recently discovered coronavirus (COVID-19) is a new virus that can cause an infection in people, including a severe respiratory illness.

What is a close contact?

A close contact is someone who has been face to face for at least 15 minutes with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, or been in the same closed space for at least 2 hours, when that person was potentially infectious. Being a close contact means there is a significant risk of becoming infected with novel coronavirus.

What do I need to do?

Stay at home or in your hotel room

  • Isolate yourself at home until 14 days after you were last exposed to the infectious person.
    • You should not leave your house except to seek medical attention.
    • You should stay in a different room to other people as much as possible. Use a separate bathroom if available.
    • Do not go to work, school, university, work or attend public places or events. Do not use public transport or taxi services.
    • Where possible, get others such as friends or family, who are not required to be isolated, to get food or other necessities for you.
  • If you have difficulties getting food or necessities, call 1800 675 398 for support.
  • If you need a translator first call 131 450, then request the hotline on 1800 675 398. More information is available on our website: vic.gov.au/novelcoronavirus
  • Please keep Triple Zero (000) for emergencies only.

Going outside

If you live in a private house, then it is safe for you to go outside into your garden, balcony or courtyard.

If you live in an apartment it is also safe for you to go outside into the garden while wearing a surgical mask. You should, however, go quickly through any common areas on the way to the garden. Wear a surgical mask if you have to move through these areas.

Monitor your symptoms

  • Monitor your health until 14 days after you were last exposed to the infectious person.
  • Watch for any of these signs and symptoms:
    • fever
    • cough
    • shortness of breath
  • Other early symptoms can include chills, body aches, sore throat, headache, runny nose, muscle pain or diarrhoea.

You will be contacted daily by a Public Health Officer to check whether you have had symptoms.

What if I develop symptoms?

If you develop any of the symptoms listed above:

  • Call a doctor or hospital and inform them that you have had contact with a confirmed case of novel coronavirus and you have symptoms.
  • Put on a mask if you have one.
  • Keep yourself away from others (for example, in a different room).
  • Do not go to work, school, university, work or attend public places or events. Do not use public transport or taxi services.
  • When you arrive at the general practice or hospital, tell them again that you are a contact of a confirmed case of novel coronavirus.

Your doctor or staff at the hospital emergency department will ensure you are wearing a mask and take you through to a room away from others.

The doctor will contact our department on 1300 651 160. They may organise to take nose and throat swabs to send for testing for the novel coronavirus.

If you are experiencing severe symptoms, such as shortness of breath:

  • Call 000 and request an ambulance.
  • Inform the ambulance officers that you have been in close contact with a confirmed case of novel coronavirus.

How can I prevent the spread of the virus?

Practising good hand and sneeze/cough hygiene is the best defence:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water before and after eating as well as after attending the toilet.
  • Avoid all contact with others.
  • Cough and sneeze into your elbow.

Should I wear a face mask?

Face masks are not recommended if you do not have symptoms. A facemask will not protect you against becoming infected.

If you are ill, you should put on a mask if you have one to prevent spreading the infection to others. You will be given a mask to wear by your doctor.

Looking after your well-being during isolation

Being confined to home for an extended period of time can cause stress and conflict. Tips for looking after yourself include:

  • Talk to the other members of the family about the infection. Understanding novel coronavirus will reduce anxiety.
  • Reassure young children using age-appropriate language.
  • Think about how you have coped with difficult situations in the past and reassure yourself that you will cope with this situation too. Remember that self-isolation won’t last for long.
  • Exercise regularly. Options could include exercise DVDs, dancing, floor exercises, yoga, walking around the backyard or using home exercise equipment, such as a stationary bicycle, if you have it. Exercise is a proven treatment for stress.
  • Keep in touch with family members and friends via telephone, email or social media.
  • Keep up a normal daily routine as much as possible.
  • Arrange with your employer to work from home, if possible.
  • Ask your child’s school to supply assignments, work sheets and homework by post or email, or if the student can join the class using online options.
  • Don’t rely too heavily on the television and technology. Treat self-isolation as an opportunity to do some of those things you never usually have time for, such as board games, craft, drawing and reading.
  • If you are struggling to cope you call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636.

Where can I find out more information?

Call the Department of Health and Human Services on to discuss any questions you have. If you need a translator first call 131 450, then request the to be put through to the department on 1300 651 160.

For Victorian updates to the current incident, go to: https://www.dhhs.vic.gov.au/novelcoronavirus

For national updates: https://www.health.gov.au/news/latest-information-about-novel-coronavirus

For international updates: https://www.who.int/westernpacific/emergencies/novel-coronavirus

WHO resources  https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus

 

To receive this publication in an accessible format phone 1300 651 160, using the National Relay Service 131 450 if required, or email Public Health branch <public.health@dhhs.vic.gov.au>.

Authorised and published by the Victorian Government, 1 Treasury Place, Melbourne.

© State of Victoria, Australia, Department of Health and Human Services February, 2020

Isolation guidance


If you have returned to Australia from overseas, or been in close contact with a confirmed case of
coronavirus, special restrictions apply. This information sheet should be read in conjunction with
the ‘What you need to know’ and ‘Isolation guidance’ information sheets at
www.health.gov.au/covid19-resources


Who needs to isolate?

All people who arrive in Australia from midnight 15 March 2020, or think may they have been in
close contact with a confirmed case of coronavirus, are required to self-isolate for 14 days.
Stay at home or in your hotel.

When travelling home or to your hotel to start isolation use personal transport, such as a car, to
minimise exposure to others. If you need to use public transport (e.g. taxis, ride-hail services,
trains, buses and trams), follow the precautions outlined in the public transport guide at
www.health.gov.au/covid19-resources


During the 14 days of isolation, you must stay at home or in your hotel and don’t go to public
places including work, school, childcare, university or public gatherings. Only people who usually
live with you should be in the home. Do not see visitors. If you are in a hotel, avoid contact with
other guests or staff.

If you are well, there is no need to wear surgical masks at home. Ask others who are not in
isolation to get food and necessities for you. If you must leave home, such as to seek medical
care, wear a surgical mask. If you don’t have a mask, take care to not cough or sneeze on others.
For more information about when to wear a mask, visit: www.health.gov.au/covid19-resources


Monitor symptoms
When in isolation, monitor yourself for symptoms including fever, cough, sore throat, tiredness or
shortness of breath. Other possible symptoms include chills, body aches, runny nose and muscle
pain.


What do I do if I get sick?
If you develop symptoms (fever, a cough, sore throat, tiredness or shortness of breath) within
14 days of returning to Australia, or within 14 days of last contact of a confirmed case, you should
arrange to see your doctor for urgent assessment.


You should telephone the health clinic or hospital before you arrive and tell them your travel
history or that you have been in contact with a confirmed case of coronavirus.


You must remain isolated either in your home, hotel or a healthcare setting until public health
authorities inform you it is safe for you to return to your usual activities.
How can I prevent the spread of coronavirus?


Practising good hand and sneeze/cough hygiene and keeping your distance from others when
you are sick is the best defence against most viruses.

You should:
 Wash your hands frequently with soap and water, before and after eating, and after going
to the toilet.
 Cover your cough and sneeze, dispose of tissues, and wash your hands.
 If unwell, avoid contact with others (stay more than 1.5 metres from people).
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) 2
 Exercise personal responsibility for social distancing measures.
Going outside


If you live in a private house, it is safe for you to go into your garden or courtyard. If you live in an
apartment or are staying in a hotel, it is also safe for you to go into the garden but you should
wear a surgical mask to minimise risk to others and move quickly through any common areas.
Advice for others living with you


Others that live with you are not required to be isolated unless they meet one of the isolation
criteria outlined above. If you develop symptoms and are suspected to have coronavirus, they will
be classified as close contacts and will need to be isolated.


Cleaning

To minimise the spread of any germs you should regularly clean surfaces that are frequently
touched such as door handles, light switches, kitchen and bathroom areas. Clean with household
detergent or disinfectant.


Managing the 14 day isolation
Being in isolation can be stressful and boring. Suggestions include:
 Keep in touch with family members and friends via telephone, email or social media.
 Learn about coronavirus and talk with others.
 Reassure young children using age-appropriate language.
 Where possible, keep up normal daily routines, such as eating and exercise.
 Arrange to work from home.
 Ask your child’s school to supply assignments or homework by post or email.
 Do things that help you relax and use isolation as an opportunity to do activities you don’t
usually have time for.


More information
For the latest advice, information and resources, go to www.health.gov.au
Call the National Coronavirus Help Line on 1800 020 080. It operates 24 hours a day, seven days
a week. If you require translating or interpreting services, call 131 450.
The phone number of your state or territory public health agency is available at
www.health.gov.au/state-territory-contacts


If you have concerns about your health, speak to your doctor.

 

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19)

Factsheet for people aged over 65 years

 

What is coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses which may cause illness in animals or humans.

The most recently discovered coronavirus (COVID-19) is a new virus that can cause an infection in people, including a severe respiratory illness.

Who is at risk?

We are still learning about this new virus. Early indications are that people over 65 and people with pre-existing medical conditions such as heart and lung disease are more at risk of experiencing severe symptoms

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Many people will suffer only mild symptoms those most at risk may experience severe symptoms. The most common symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Breathing difficulties such as breathlessness
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Fatigue or tiredness.

How does COVID-19 spread?

COVID-19 spreads through close contact with an infected person; mostly face-to-face or within a household. It cannot jump across a room or be carried for long distances in the air. 

  • Close contact means greater than 15 minutes face-to-face or the sharing of a closed space for more than two hours with a confirmed case.
  • A close contact could include any person meeting any of the following criteria:
  • living in the same household or household-like setting (for example, a boarding school or hostel)
  • direct contact with the body fluids or laboratory specimens of a confirmed case
  • a person who spent two hours or longer in the same room
  • face-to-face contact for more than 15 minutes with the case in any other setting not listed above.

How do I reduce my risk of contracting COVID-19?

  • Wash hands often with soap and running water, for at least 20 seconds. Dry with paper towel or hand dryer.
  • Try not to touch your eyes, nose or mouth.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. If you don’t have a tissue cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve or elbow.
  • Isolate yourself at home if you feel sick. If you take medication ensure you have adequate supplies.
  • Phone your GP first if you need medical attention. They will tell you what to do.
  • Continue healthy habits: exercise, drink water, get plenty of sleep, and now is the time to quit smoking. Call the Quitline 137 848.
  • Don't wear a face mask if you are well.
  • Buy an alcohol-based hand sanitiser with over 60 per cent alcohol.
  • Get the flu shot (available April). This won’t protect you from COVID-19, but it will reduce your risk of getting the flu.

Residential aged care services

The Australian Government has identified a number of high risk countries.

If people have travelled to any of the at risk countries in the last 14 days, they should not visit family and friends living aged care services. A current list of at risk countries available here:
www1.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/ohp-covid-19-countries.htm

 

Authorised and published by the Victorian Government, 1 Treasury Place, Melbourne.

© State of Victoria, Department of Health and Human Services, 5 March 2020.